In Nigella Lawson's Career, One Recipe Stands Above The Rest

Charismatic, down-to-earth, and relatable are words used to describe the beloved Nigella Lawson. Before writing her first cookbook in 1998 (via Woman and Home ) and becoming the esteemed cookbook writer she is today, the British foodie began her career in publishing, working for numerous publications such as "The Spectator" and "The Sunday Times." Despite being dubbed the "Queen of Cooking," Lawson takes pride in the fact that she is not a professionally trained chef (via Twisted Food). The London-born star didn't even read her first cookbook until she was 15 years old. Her biggest mentor in the kitchen? Her late mom, who tragically died from cancer at the age of 48. In an interview with Hello Magazine, Lawson refers to her mother as "the cook I have learned the most from."

Today, Lawson has published 13 cookbooks, which have collectively sold more than eight million copies, as noted by Amazon. To say that "The Taste" co-host influences the culinary world is an understatement. According to Woman and Home, when the British chef includes ingredients in her recipes like Riesling wine or goose fat, sales of those products dramatically increase at U.K. grocery stores. Lawson has crafted and created countless recipes throughout her career, but if she had to pick one, which would she call her signature dish?

Lawson's star dish requires only a few ingredients

As a celebrity chef with hundreds of recipes in your repertoire, narrowing down your vast selection to a single stand-out dish probably isn't the easiest of tasks. In an interview with Food52, Nigella Lawson confirms that this is very much the case. "I'm not sure it's possible to do what I do and have a signature," she began. One of the reasons that Lawson struggles to narrow down her repertoire to a one-star recipe, is that she caters the food she cooks toward the people she is cooking for. For example, if the "At My Table" host is preparing a meal for a boss, her go-to would be something homey but impressive, such as a lamb stew and mashed potatoes. For a new friend, she would prepare something that wasn't too fussy, such as coconut shrimp. 

But if she had to pick her recipe of all recipes?  Lawson would go with a chicken traybake. "I would hesitate to choose any one dish in particular because I'll go through a period of doing one over another," she shared with Food52. "For a long time I did the traybake with bitter orange and fennel, but now I lean more toward the one with peas and leeks, or the Indian spice and potato one." If there's one thing that Lawson is an expert in, it's how to prepare a simple chicken dish with a twist.