The Yorkshire Pudding You've Always Wanted To Try

You know that funny old expression about how Great Britain and the United States are two nations divided by a common language? When it comes to food, it often rings true. They say crisps, we say chips. They say chips, we say fries. They say biscuits, we say cookies. And when it comes to Yorkshire pudding, the confusion is at a fever pitch, because if when you hear this food's name you expect a bowl of smooth, gooey goodness, you're going to be, well, actually not let down ... but rather pleasantly surprised. Because while Yorkshire pudding is nothing like the creamy sweet treat you might be expecting, it's a delicious recipe that tastes great no matter which side of the pond you're on.

So, what is Yorkshire pudding exactly? Chef and recipe developer Mark Beahm of The Sunday Baker (and himself an American ex-pat) says of these muffin-like treats: "I think Yorkshire puddings are all about the texture. They're crisp on the outside with a hollow, custardy interior. You can serve them with butter, but they're also excellent for soaking up gravy." So, they're more akin to a fancy bread than a gooey dessert, and very much welcome on your dinner table.

Sound good? If so, grab your popover pan, which is like a deep muffin pan. If you don't have a popover pan, Beahm says, "You can use a muffin pan instead. If you bake the Yorkshire puddings in a muffin pan, they'll be a bit smaller and cook faster."

Gather your ingredients for Yorkshire pudding

According to Beahm, "Yorkshire pudding is traditionally made with the drippings from a roast. If you use pan drippings, the Yorkshire puddings will have a rich flavor from your roast, [but] you can use other cooking fats, and the Yorkshire pudding will take on the flavor of whichever fat you choose to use."

We're going to assume you're not making a roast, but still want some of these delightful, bread-y treats, so instead of fat drippings, gather 4 tablespoons of butter, shortening, lard, or cooking oil, 2 cups of all-purpose flour, ½ teaspoon of salt, 4 large eggs, 1 cup of whole milk, and ⅔ cup of water.

Prepare the batter for Yorkshire pudding

Start things off by whisking together the flour and salt in a medium or large mixing bowl. Next, make a well in the flour (a deep imprint, like a bowl), and add the eggs and water to the center of the well. Use a whisk to beat the eggs, gradually drawing in flour from around the well. Take your time, and whisk until smooth.

Then, whisk in the milk a splash at a time, waiting until each pour is fully incorporated before adding more. The consistency of the batter should be similar to heavy cream. Once it's prepped, let the batter rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Pre-heat and prep the popover pan

While the batter rests, preheat the oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit. Then, divide the butter (or cooking fat or oil or even the roast drippings, if you're going full-on traditional with the recipe) evenly among the wells in the popover pan. Remember that a muffin tray is okay to use, if need be.

Heat the pan in the hot oven until the fat is melted and sizzling, which will take about three to five minutes. Be careful not to let the butter burn if you're using it, as it will produce some noticeably off flavors in the finished puddings.

Pour in the batter, and bake it

Carefully take the pan with the heated butter, oil, or fat out of the hot oven, and set it on a heatproof surface. Fill each well about ½ to ¾ full with batter. (Stick with ½ if using a muffin tray, using more than 8 of the muffin cups in that case.)

Transfer the pan with the batter back to the oven, and bake the puddings for 25 minutes, or until they have inflated well above the pan and have taken on a deep golden brown color. If you're using a muffin tin, bake the puddings for about 15 minutes.

Enjoy your Yorkshire puddings with meats, roasted veggies, and maybe something sweet for dessert, like ... pudding?

The Yorkshire Pudding You've Always Wanted To Try
5 from 12 ratings
With its crisp exterior and custardy interior, Yorkshire pudding is the side dish your dinner has been missing.
Prep Time
45
minutes
Cook Time
25
minutes
Servings
8
popovers
Yorkshire Pudding
Ready in 70 minutes
Ingredients
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 4 tablespoons butter, shortening, lard, or cooking oil
  • ⅔ cup water
  • ½ teaspoon salt
Directions
  1. Whisk together the flour and salt in a mixing bowl. Then, make a well in the flour and add the eggs and water to the center of the well.
  2. Use a whisk to beat the eggs, gradually drawing flour from the inside walls of the well. Whisk until smooth.
  3. Whisk in the milk a splash at a time, waiting until fully incorporated before adding more. The consistency of the batter should be similar to thick heavy cream.
  4. Let the batter rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.
  5. While the batter rests, preheat the oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit and divide the butter (or cooking fat) evenly among the wells in the popover pan.
  6. Heat the pan in the oven until the butter or fat is melted and sizzling, which takes about three to five minutes (and be careful not to burn if using butter).
  7. Take the pan out of the oven and set on a heatproof surface, then fill each well about ½ to ¾ full with batter.
  8. Transfer the pan to the oven, and bake the popovers for 25 minutes, or until inflated and deep golden brown. If baking in a muffin tin, bake the popovers for about 15 minutes.
Nutrition
Calories per Serving 230
Total Fat 10.7 g
Saturated Fat 1.9 g
Trans Fat 0.0 g
Cholesterol 96.1 mg
Total Carbohydrates 25.5 g
Dietary Fiber 0.8 g
Total Sugars 1.7 g
Sodium 195.4 mg
Protein 7.3 g
The information shown is Edamam’s estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.
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