Once-popular foods that we all stopped eating

We've all suffered from a bit of nostalgia at some point, a sort of sad longing for days gone by. If that sounds familiar, you should count yourself lucky it's the 21st century. Just a few hundred years ago, says The Atlantic, nostalgia was considered a mental illness "treated" by everything from shaming to being buried alive.

One of the things thought to cause nostalgia was eating strange, unfamiliar food, and it makes sense. There's a reason that familiar staples are called comfort food, after all, and food connects us to not just others, but to our past, and especially to our childhoods. Tastes and smells can be a powerful thing, and some foods bring back memories of holidays with the family, of birthday celebrations, and hot summer days that seemed to last forever.

So, let's take a walk down memory lane and experience some nostalgia — here's some once-popular foods that have just sort of… disappeared.

Sunny Delight

Remember Sunny D? That ridiculously orange drink that kids clambered for throughout the '80s and '90s? What happened to that stuff, anyway?

The Tab says Sunny Delight hit shelves in 1968, well before we were really paying attention things like artificial ingredients. It was almost insanely popular, and when it hit the UK in 1998 it came in behind only Coke and Pepsi in the drinks market. That's weird, because it was essentially 4 to 5 percent fruit juice and 95 percent a watery, super-runny corn syrup.

Yum. Sunny D's downfall came due to a combination of a few things. The Food Commission, an independent consumer commission in the UK, started to call out manufacturer Procter & Gamble for their misleading advertising that suggested there was some sort of nutritional value to the stuff, when there definitely wasn't. And in 1999, a 5-year-old Welsh girl really did turn a yellowish-orange color after drinking way, way too much of it. That story passed into urban legend territory (but it's completely true), and Sunny D overhauled their recipe and rebranded in an attempt to shake their super unhealthy image. It's still on shelves, but it never really got popular again.  

Crisco

There was a time when every kitchen had a big tin of Crisco kicking around somewhere. It's what made all those homemade chocolate chip cookies taste so amazing, but unfortunately, we know now that it's horrible for you. It was just partially hydrogenated vegetable oil processed into a solid, which means it was pretty much a bucket of trans fat.

Crisco has changed their recipe since then, says NPR, but it hasn't reclaimed a place in our kitchens. Part of the reason for the fall of Crisco is likely the massive shift in how it's been portrayed. NPR says it was first marketed as a super-healthy alternative to lard, and even through the 1980s it — and other trans fats — were promoted as much healthier than saturated fats.

All that changed in the 1990s, when we started to realize just how bad trans fats are. Even though the Crisco of today isn't the same as the Crisco of the '80s, it's hard to recover from the devastating findings that your "healthy" wonder-food is slowly clogging your customers' arteries.

Pudding Pops

Pudding Pops were pretty much the perfect treat for those hazy, lazy days of summer vacation. You can't find them today, though, so… what happened?

Surprisingly, the disappearance of these doesn't have anything to do with the meteoric downfall of the once-beloved celebrity spokesperson who made them famous: Bill Cosby. Culinary Lore credits Cosby and Jell-O's 1980s marketing campaign for their huge popularity, and in the first year they logged $100 million in sales. That tripled in the first five years, but the company quickly realized that big sales don't necessarily translate into big profits.

The problem was that Jell-O didn't have much experience in the frozen foods business. Producing and distributing a frozen product like Pudding Pops added a ton of overhead that the company could have avoided by sticking to dry products like Jell-O packets. With profit margins tight, Jell-O discontinued the product in the early '90s, before licensing the rights to Popsicle in 2004. After that, they became Popsicle-branded Jell-O pudding pops, with an entirely new recipe and a different shape that people just weren't as fond of. Eventually, the new version was also discontinued and Jell-O Pudding Pops vanished from our shelves for good."

Candy cigarettes

Given what we know now about the dangers of smoking, it's pretty shocking it wasn't that long ago candy cigarettes were marketed to kids — complete with knock-off packaging that advertised "brands" like "Kamel" and "Winstun." It wasn't just an adorable gimmick, either. Mother Jones reports that a 2007 survey done of 25,000 people found those who "smoked" candy cigarettes as kids were about twice as likely to become adult smokers.

The first candy cigarettes were actually chocolate, and they were made by Hershey at the turn of the century. The chalky, more realistic-looking ones came in the 1920s, and they were actually banned by one state — North Dakota — between 1953 and 1967.

They were still pretty popular, though, as manufacturers advertised they could make you "Just Like Daddy." They were never actually outlawed — Big Tobacco blocked legislation that would have taken away what was essentially free advertising — but after the truth about smoking came out in the 1980s, parents were suddenly less keen to encourage their kids to pick up a deadly habit. You can still get them, technically, but they're called "candy sticks."

Cottage cheese

Cottage cheese has a long history, as it dates back to a Colonial era when nothing went to waste — not even the leftover milk that was scraped off the cream. It's been pretty consistently produced, but it wasn't until the 1950s that it became super trendy. It was popular for decades, so popular in the 1960s that it was mentioned in Mad Men, and it peaked in the 1970s, says NPR's The Salt. Americans averaged about five pounds a year, it was a common ingredient in other recipes, says the Independent, and more importantly it was eaten alone by the more health-conscious of diners.

Somewhere along the line, though, people became less enamored with cottage cheese's weird texture and bland taste. Part of the problem is likely that it's hard to make a cottage cheese that's consistent, but yogurt? That's much easier to make, much more of a consistent product, and manufacturers have developed so many flavors and types that everyone's bound to find something they like. Not surprisingly, the more old-fashioned cottage cheese got kicked to the curb.

TV dinners

While not many people are reaching in the freezer to pull out a TV dinner these days, they changed the way we eat. They were first developed in the 1950s, and according to The Atlantic, they were created by Swanson as a way to package and sell Thanksgiving leftovers. There's another part of the story, too — the BBC notes they were the brainchild of bacteriologist Betty Cronin, who was inspired by the search for a way to keep business high after the need for supplying wartime rations to the troops ended.

They ultimately kick-started our love for everything pre-wrapped, already prepped, and simplified, but then a weird thing happened. Swanson sold 25 million meals the first year their TV dinners hit the shelves, and sales steadily climbed until 2008. That's when sales dropped with such startling speed that Nestle was ready to unload their frozen food division, valued at around $400 million. Since then, sales have continued to drop or remain flat, and with more and more people valuing freshness over convenience, it seems as though the day of the TV dinner has passed.

Congealed salads

Congealed salads — which are basically everything and anything from fruit and vegetables to fish and meats encased in jiggly Jell-O — were popular for a long, long time. The basic idea has been around since medieval Europe, when it wasn't Jell-O, but gelatin made from calf feet.

Serious Eats says there are a few reasons they were popular. They were a practical way to use leftovers, they were versatile, easy, and mess-free, and by the time World War II rolled around, they were a bit of deliciousness in the face of rationing. (The Daily Meal adds they were also a bit of a status symbol, because if you could afford the refrigerator you needed to make it, you were doing pretty well.) They stayed so popular that by the 1960s, Jell-O released savory flavors (like mixed vegetable and celery), but once we moved into the 1970s, congealed salads started heading out.

Part of it was convenience — they're actually pretty time-consuming to make — and part of the reason was because even then, we were trying to cut back on sugar. You can still find people making Jell-O salads, as they've managed to stay in vogue, particularly in Utah. For the rest of the country… not so much.

Orange juice

For decades, fruit juice was an important part of almost everyone's breakfast. In recent years, however, breakfast had changed. In 2014, Quartz reported orange juice sales were particularly hard-hit, sinking about 40 percent over the previous 15 years. Three years later, they were reporting the trend was continuing in America and in Europe.

That's a huge difference from the previous decades. For around 50 years orange juice was present at most breakfast tables — at it's peak, an average of 75 percent of American households had orange juice in the fridge all the time. The drink's heyday started after World War II, when scientists finally discovered how to process it and get it to your table while making sure it still tasted like oranges. But in the late 1990s, price increases due to insect blight, a decline in the number of people who eat breakfast, and an increased awareness of just how much sugar is in orange juice, started a steady decline.

That's presenting some serious problems for Brazil, who produces most of the world's oranges. The decline is so bad that they're looking elsewhere for what they can do to fill the void, and that speaks volumes as to just how out of love we've fallen with this one-time favorite.

Kool-Aid

Remember making Kool-Aid on a hot summer day? It was so easy, even the youngest kids could do it. Just dump a ton of sugar into some water, add the packet, and done!

It is any wonder we've kind of gotten away from this super-sugary, artificially-colored drink?

There was something else that caused the fall of Kool-Aid, too, and it has nothing to do with sweetness. In 1978, Jim Jones and his followers were front and center in one of the most horrific cult massacres of the century. According to The Atlantic, more 900 people died after drinking a toxic mixture Jones gave them. It was poison, and it was also grape Flavor Aid.

No, it wasn't Kool-Aid, but the tragedy gave rise to the saying, "Don't drink the Kool-Aid," which is basically a warning not to blindly follow leaders that are anywhere from misguided to maniacal. Forbes says the association — even though it's completely wrong — between the Jonestown massacre and Kool-Aid did some serious damage to Kool-Aid's reputation, and it's one of the heartbreaking reasons you probably don't keep this in your cupboard any more.

Sloppy joes

If you completely forgot this childhood favorite even existed, you're not alone. Sure, you can still find them occasionally and there's even at least one gourmet sloppy joe food truck out there, but they're nowhere near the weekly dinnertime staple they once were.

Eat A Sandwich took to social media to try to find out just when was the last time someone had a sloppy joe, and answers varied but hovered around, "Some time in the 1990s." No one really knows why they fell off our dinnertime radar, especially considering that many people that were asked remembered them as tasting pretty good.

There were a ton of theories, though, and many are legit. It's possible it's a health thing, and they're just too high in sodium for people. The name might be turning people off as adults, and they haven't been targeted with the same kind of makeover foods like grilled cheese have. One response was the simple, straightforward, "Because we're not 11."

Ambrosia salad

Think back to almost every backyard BBQ, cookout, and family reunion you went to as a kid… there were at least a few dishes of ambrosia salad, weren't there? There are a ton of ways to make them, but most involve Jell-O, whipped cream or Cool Whip, cream cheese, and chunky bits from pineapple and oranges to coconut and pecans.

Sounds… interesting? Serious Eats says ambrosia salad dates back at least to the late 1800s, and adds that it likely became popular because at the time, all those ingredients were special, exotic treats. It became linked with Christmas traditions, and it just sort of stuck around in the South.

While there's a small portion of the population — again, mostly in the American south — that is trying to give ambrosia salad a makeover and re-popularize it, NPR found many people are just happy this weird stuff is going the way of the dodo.