The Bizarre Connection The Newest Pokémon Has To Bread

At first glance, "Pokémon" might not seem food-related. The animated show isn't focused on food. As far as we know, people aren't supposed to chew the trading cards, and the goal of video games is not to catch 'em all and then eat 'em. However, the animal-like creatures whose lives involve evolving and fighting have inspired food items, and it appears some Pokémon have been inspired by food.

An Oreo collab produced Pokémon-themed sandwich cookies with various characters replacing the Oreo logo on the cookie. Pop Tarts made a wild cherry flavor with Pokémon sprinkles a while back. And Eggo created some nostalgia-inducing Pokémon waffles, complete with character faces. On the flip side, many speculated that a recent Pokémon, Lechonk, is named after a roast pig. As explained by Gamer Rant, part of its name, "lechon," means "suckling pig" in Spanish. On top of that, it has an uncanny resemblance to a pig, making the connection to a pork dish plausible. Recently, The Pokémon Company unveiled new characters in a press release, and one of them appears to be based on another food.

Puppy or pastry?

One look at this Pokémon's name might give you an idea about the inspiration. Fidough has the look of either a bunch of different forms of bread slammed together or a pale balloon animal, but according to Delish, it's more likely the former. The new Pokémon not only has "dough in its name, but it has other bread-themed features.

According to The Pokémon Company press release, "Fidough's skin has elastic qualities and is both firm and soft at the same time." Delish observes that the stretching abilities are not dissimilar to how one would describe a sourdough starter kit. Plus, Fidough has yeast breath with the ability to cause fermentation and which the press release notes "is useful for cooking."

It seems that Pokémon fans are loving the newest little creature. There's at least one page on Twitter dedicated to the adorable "pup." Others have posted fan art based on Fidough, presenting it as a pretzel, baguette, and even a donut.